Manure LinkWelcome to Manure Link. Whatcom Conservation District will maintain this program to help connect manure producers with people seeking manure. Manure Link is a simple way to recycle valuable nutrients and organic matter from farms with surplus to others who need it. 

This is a “no guarantees, use at your own risk” service. Manure and compost are generally not certified to be weed-free or organic. The material may not be suitable for all intended uses.

This is a voluntary, community project, so please be considerate of those participating in this service.

Access to the Manure Link Sign-up: https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/ed6fed590e5d438cb74b23c61a2685eb 

manure loadedManure Producers

How the program works for livestock owners/manure producers: 

  1. Collect your manure.
  2. Review the Manure Sharing notes below.
  3. Post your ad on manure link and provide information on your compost such as age, type, and amount. The map below is where current locations with manure are located around the county.
  4. Arrange for Manure Seekers to pick up at a time that suits you both. 
  5. By giving your manures to others you will reduce the amount of manure being stockpiled on your farm.

Select Manure Producer below and please fill in each field so that Manure Seekers can contact you for you manure! In the additional details, if you are composting, make sure to specify if the temperature of the compost got hot enough to kill pathogens and weed species (131°F for at least 3 weeks). Also specify if the quantity is large enough for pasture fertilization or a landscaping operation or if it is better suited for individual gardeners.

Manure Seekers

Manure Link App

How the program works for Manure Seekers - We will use your contact info to send you a link to a searchable map, the above is a map of the current locations where manure is available.

  1. Determine your needs: What quality of material are you looking for? How much do you need?
  2. Pick a source: Consult the Manure Link list and choose a location close to you that meets your needs. Review the details of the listing to learn about how the manure is stored or if the pile is composted. Read more about composting below and also the additional resources for more information.
  3. Schedule pick-up: Arrange a time to pick up the material at a time that suits both of you. Whatcom Conservation District also has a list of contractors in your area who haul and spread manure. 
  4. Use your Manure: Depending on your needs, compost your manure on your site over the next 6 months. Or if the material is ready, apply as needed as a soil amendment. 

*Whatcom Conservation District has a two-yard manure spreader available to landowners in our service area. Learn more about the Manure Spreader here. Contact Whatcom Conservation District for a list of contractors in your area who spread manures. 

manure to gardenYou’ve Got It – Now What?
Properly composted manure, allowed to go through 120 to 180 days of hot composting, is best, but you can also get fresh manure and compost it yourself. When using fresh manure, allow it to age (i.e. compost) for six months to avoid any potential problems. Keeping your pile moist, and turning it periodically, will speed up the process. Do not use fresh manure on vegetables, especially root crops, due to the potential of transmitting pathogens. Many people spread the manure in their gardens in the fall and rototill it in spring before planting. Incorporate it to a depth of 6 to 8 inches so you can get the full benefit of the compost. 

Proper use of manure in the garden can help not only supply nutrients, it can also help soil aeration and drainage, which ultimately results in healthier plants. Most manure application is based on nitrogen content and how much is actually available to the plants in the first growing season. However, too much manure can lead to nutrient runoff, excessive vegetative growth and in some cases, salt damage. Salts in fresh manure can be high, especially in poultry manure. Poultry manure is also high in nitrogen and tends to be ‘hot’, which can burn plants. To avoid both salt damage and burning your plants, either compost the manure first or wait 3 to 4 weeks after application to plant the area. Some manure is high in phosphorous as well, so you may want to get a soil test to make sure your phosphorus levels aren’t getting too high.

Learn more about manure application timing and placement on our WCD Manure Spreading Advisory.

The Variations of Compost
There are many variations of compost – depending on livestock type, bedding used, etc. - but it’s important to know your sources. Ask the farmer if their animals have been recently de-wormed, or if the hay they feed is treated with an herbicide.  Some crops are more susceptible to residuals such as potatoes, peas, carrots, lettuce, and tomatoes. Make sure the manure you haul in is from herbivores (sheep, llamas, goats, cattle, and horses) rather than pigs. (Never use cat, dog, or pig manure in vegetable gardens or compost piles. Parasites that may be in these types of manure are more likely to survive and infect people than those in other types of manure). 

Your composted manure may have bedding mixed in which is fine, it will help improve soil tilth as well. If the compost has not been thoroughly broken down and has a high amount of bedding, it can actually draw nitrogen out of the soil in the composting process, robbing plants of much-needed nitrogen. Horse manure alone has the perfect carbon-nitrogen ratio for composting, although most horse manure is too high in bedding to readily compost. When manure is correctly composted, the finished product is mostly free of odor, flies and some weed seeds, and can be easier to load and haul since it likely has less moisture than fresh manure. The articles in the resource section offer more in-depth information on the use of manure and compost in gardens. WCD cannot guarantee the quality of compost advertised. To ensure you are getting manure that has been composted thoroughly and safely, follow guidelines described here and on our website.

More Resources:

Disclaimer for Manure Link:

Whatcom Conservation District provides Manure Link as a free service to benefit gardeners, farmers, and livestock owners. Manure Link connects those wanting sources of local manure/compost with livestock owners/managers who have more fresh or composted manure than they need.

This is a “no guarantees, use at your own risk” service. Manure and compost are generally not certified to be weed-free or organic. The material may not be suitable for all intended uses.

Providers are not responsible for hauling costs or any costs associated with vehicle/dump-truck rentals, etc. This is a voluntary, community project, so please be considerate of those participating in this service.

The Whatcom Conservation District cannot guarantee the quality of compost advertised. To ensure you are getting manure that has been composted thoroughly and safely, follow guidelines described here and on our website.

 

This page was last modified on 04/07/20 - 11:05